There are some people who wake up very quickly, and any noise is a reason to get them up from a deep sleep. While other people don’t wake up with despite the noise at all. But what happens when we are in a coma?

In Andy Szasz’s case, the barking of his pet was what woke him from the deep coma he was in.

Little Teddy has now been baptized as his owner’s guardian angel, having aided in his recovery. The hospital staff, at the request of Andy’s wife, authorized his dog’s visit and allowed him to sit next to his bed.

“They put Teddy in my chest and he woke me up. Somehow, I think he’s my guardian angel,” Andy said.

Help with recovery

In 2016, Andy Szasz, a 65-years-old man, was doing treatment for bowel cancer when he also had pneumonia. Which greatly aggravated his state of health, and the doctors then decided to induce him into coma.

In weak health, Andy’s wife asked the hospital staff if it would be possible to get Teddy to visit her husband. The doctors authorized the visit and lay him on his chest.

After 4 days in a come, he woke with Teddy on his chest, licking his face. That left the doctors amazed by the situation.

After being discharged from the hospital, Teddy has been a key part of Andy’s recovery process. His faithful companion remains by his side and always accompanies him in his daily walks and exercises.

Animal Therapy

And the great friendship story between Andy and his little dog has gained momentum on the media channels. They participated in an episode of Dog Rescuers, a British television program accompanying the animal charity work of RPSCA, an organization that promotes animal care. The focus of the episode was the transforming power of therapy dogs in patient recovery.

“I always tell people that I rescued Teddy and that he rescued me. We have a special bond,” Szasz tells The Times.

Today, Teddy is not just a pet dog. He’s officially a therapy dog. He works at Southampton General Hospital now. He and his owner, Andy, who has also volunteered for more than a year, have helped several patients with animal therapy. And it does not stop there. He still visits other patients in nursing homes, schools and medical centers in the UK.